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Mixed-Use Site Gets New Life at Chinatown Gates

GlobeSt.com | November 21, 2019 by Lisa Brown

The 69,600-square-foot retail and office mixed-use project at 300 Grant is set to breathe new life into the corner of Grant Avenue and Sutter Street, housing three stories of office space above three stories of retail.


Located at the gates to Chinatown and in the heart of Union Square, the 69,600-square-foot retail and office mixed-use project at 300 Grant is set to breathe new life into the corner of Grant Avenue and Sutter Street. The six-story building will house three stories of office space above three stories of prime retail.


In an effort to meld the public realm with the private sector, the formerly underutilized side alley, Harlan Place, will also be transformed into a publicly accessible parklet. This grassy area will have permanent and temporary seating, along with a wind-generated public art component by local artist Ned Kahn.

This new mixed-use complex was conceptualized by using virtual reality as a way to help better visualize and identify any issues within the space in its early stages, according to project architect MBH Architects.


“Some challenges included navigating the privately owned public spaces requirement, and deciding on a design for a public parklet that pleased the city, the neighborhood, as well as the public,” John McNulty, MBH founding principal, tells GlobeSt.com. “Some unique features to note are the terra cotta scrim that wraps the top four floors and provides a sense of privacy and sunlight diffusion to tenants on those floors, as well as the public parklet that encourages employees and passersby alike to enjoy the outdoor space.”


The office market continues to post robust gross leasing activity which translated into nearly 2.4 million square feet of transactions closing during the third quarter, according to a report by Colliers International. Leasing volumes at this level continue to be well above the 18-year quarterly average of 1.8 million square feet of gross leasing activity, says Colliers.


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